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How to Begin Creating a Game

Hey Guys i have a simple Question (or maybe not)

I just ask myself how do you start to making a Game ?

I wanna start creating a Game like Diablo ..... but where do i start ? Creating a level ? Creating Pawn or Create my Meshes ???

I dont know where to begin pls Help me !!

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asked Apr 09 '14 at 09:22 PM in Using UE4

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Netskill
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avatar image Robo_Izzi Sep 26 '17 at 02:10 PM

I dont know how to make a game and I want to so please help me learn how to!! I am so sad I cant learn yet!! UGH!

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If you want to create a game design doc, try out Articy:Draft (by Nevigo, it's available on Steam). It's built for the purposes of game design (before you actually start to build the game in an editor). It's a commercial product though. I guess for free you could plan out things using googledocs (spreadsheets and so on) to work out the game loop, features, and asset lists.

I think, personally speaking, that learning how to specify exactly what you want to make is the natural first step, as well as evaluating your resources (time, money, people, skills). Making a QandA/FAQ where you pose and answer questions like: How many players? What interactions are required before players actually start playing? How do players establish an online account? Do they even need to? Can the playe save their progress? Are there different modes such as session time limit, limited lives, difficulty levels? All this stuff varies hugely from game to game ... I imagine for Diablo-style games the design decision range is enormous, so you have to examine really what you think you can achieve in a reasonable time (as an indie), such as an asset rich Diablo-like level with simple gameplay, or a Diablo-like game framework with limited content. Depends how many years you have at your disposal ... or talented friends ... or money to hire people. It also depends on what your goals are for the project. Is it for personal fun, for proving your specialist skills to get a job, for selling it, for entering a contest, for learning, or whatever.

Also think about, what you like doing most (or don't like), things that a game like Diablo would require that you'd have to tackle: - designing and animating characters and setting up combinations of inputs/moves - modeling scenes and setting up scene interactions - visual effects or complex materials - user interface design and implementation - establishing framework elements like player control/camera/multiplayer/integrations/meeting platform specific requirements - managing databases of items, trade, and functions like repair, item count, skill requirements ... and so on - creative writing: dialog, story, instructions, tutorials - planning: identifying resources, scheduling, business models, post-release services, marketing, HR ... all the business stuff that goes with your game as a product

There's a book by Jesse Schelle called The Art of Game Design : A Book of Lenses that points out that good game design involves looking at your game development from multiple angles (via multiple roles). If you can answer the questions that arise when looking at your game though each 'lens' you'll be able to evaluate the suitability of your design and, hopefully, execute it better during production.

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answered Apr 10 '14 at 01:30 AM

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tomofnz
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I would start with the blueprint system. Create a project -> TP_TopDownBP. That will give you a point and click template to work with. From there, start trying to figure what you want to do. Do I want to fight something? Ok, how? I want projectiles... so then find some tutorials on how to fire stuff from the character you control. Then figure out how to place things in the game that will react to your projectiles.

Basically just go from there. You don't need a Game Design Doc. You do NOT need to know anything about the business of game development to just start messing around in UE4. Play around with the editor by figuring out the next thing you want to do and learning to do it. If you start planning out this whole big game, it'll be super intimadating. Just think... ok I have my Top Down template, now what? I want to shoot things... ok now that I can do that, what do I want to shoot... And work your way to a game.

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answered Apr 11 '14 at 05:18 PM

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Trailbound
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First of all before you create any games I would get used to the engine itself. I would understand the basics and the advanced such as BSP and static meshes and the need for performance, lighting and materials etc. However, if you understand how to create levels to a good standard then the best way to start out in my opinion is creating smaller levels or smaller games etc. Come up with an idea with a good concept and one that has good game design. For you first game it doesn't have to be too complex. You start simple and get better and better with time and experience. If I were you I would make my first game within one single level only and I would start by blocking out the level via BSP and then following a correct workflow. Look at the workflow level in content examples. Once you have the level move onto building the game. A good way to do this is using UE4's blueprints and set up events etc. Get to grips with that and you can do all kinds of things. I am not answering your questions as people do things in their own way. But these are just a few pointers.

Good Luck!!!

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answered Apr 09 '14 at 10:28 PM

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Bobsy95
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dive into StrategyGame in marketplace. Take time to familiar with ue4. From beginning, change little with that demo.

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answered Apr 10 '14 at 01:43 AM

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Baesky
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answered May 18 '18 at 03:52 PM

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jhonjho011
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