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Do we have to pay for a VR application?

I have one question concerning the license system in general. I'm not sure, if we have to pay forUE4. We are going to work on a VR-application for a customer. This application will not be distributed for money, but we are going to get paid for the job. Do we have to pay for it?

Product Version: UE 4.15
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asked Feb 28 '17 at 08:27 AM in Legal & Licensing

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l.u.j
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3 answers: sort voted first

It sounds like you're doing custom work-for-hire, where you are making a product that is unique for a single customer. If that's the case, your work-for-hire fees are royalty free (see Section 5(3)). If your customer goes on and sells the product to end users, royalties are owed on that. If your customer is not a UE licensee, then you are responsible for those royalties. But it sounds like the product won't be sold, so royalties wouldn't be an issue.

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answered Feb 28 '17 at 03:36 PM

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atypic STAFF
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I don't know about any difference in license between a regular Unreal project vs an Unreal VR project, so I'm going to refer to the regular license information.

Once you ship your game or application, you pay Epic 5% of gross revenue after the first $3,000 per product per calendar quarter. For a more detailed explanation of how that works, see the EULA and our product release page.[1] We also offer custom license terms to companies who prefer to pay an upfront license fee in order to lower the royalty rate.

  1. https://www.unrealengine.com/release

  2. https://www.unrealengine.com/custom-licensing

I'd consider sending an inquiry about a custom license to the second link, as this is somewhat in territory that I don't think necessarily belongs in a public forum - after all, how much you're getting paid for the project and such is quite likely not something we should be privvy to. :)

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answered Feb 28 '17 at 08:39 AM

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Drunkenvalley
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VR Application or not, still an application made using Unreal Engine (if that's what you use). If you're gettingn paid by delivering the product, you must pay royalty. If you hand over the engine as well, you must provide and have the customer agree to Unreal Engine's EULA.

Note, distribution to one customer is still considered distribution. So yes, "Once you ship your game or application, you pay Epic 5% of gross revenue after the first $3,000 per product per calendar quarter. " is the answer.

Though, if you do not ship and package the application, I don't think it still applies. But you would have to verify that with a staff member.

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answered Feb 28 '17 at 11:22 AM

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Devgroup
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